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EYE CARE / EYE EXAMS

eye-exams

Eye Exams

What is Examined in an Eye Exam?

At All About Eyes you will receive the same comprehensive eye exam you would at a private practice optometrist. Our doctors are fully-licensed, board-certified Doctors of Optometry. We only partner with optometrists who share our dedication to patient care and service. We believe that focus on patient care is the difference we provide, offering individualized services to fit each unique eye care need. We not only perform an exam, we let you know what we’re doing and why it’s important for your eye health. We also offer extended hours to better accommodate your busy schedule.

Each exam typically includes the following:

  • A detailed patient history reviewing your personal and family health history
  • Visual acuity testing
  • Pupil evaluation
  • Extraocular motility function
  • Examination of peripheral visual field
  • Retinoscopy
  • Refraction
  • Keratometry test
  • Biomicroscopy of the eternal ocular adnexa
  • Intraocular pressure measurement
  • Examination of the health of the internal ocular media and fundus

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Adults and Eye Exams

Adults (18-60) should receive a comprehensive eye exam every 2 years, while adults age 61 and over should have an exam every year.

Adults who have an elevated risk for eye issues may need more frequent exams. Risk factors for adult vision include but are not limited to the following:

  • A family history of eye disease
  • Previous eye injuries
  • Eye surgeries
  • Diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • Taking medication that may have visual-impacting side effects

For more information, contact your optometrist.

Children and Eye Exams

Children (6 mo-18 yrs) should receive routine eye exams, and those with risk factors for vision problems may need more frequent exams. Risk factors for eye issues in children include but are not limited to the following:

  • A family history of eye disease
  • Low birth weight or premature birth
  • Infections during the mother’s pregnancy
  • Strabismus (turned or crossed eyes)
  • Developmental delays
  • Anisometropia or high refractive error
  • Taking medication that may have visual-impacting side effects
  • Systemic disease associated with eye abnormalities

For more information, contact your optometrist.