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Eyeglasses were considered a fashion statement not long after their invention, and ornate quizzing glasses, lorgnettes, and opera glasses were often considered enviable accessories among the gilded classes. In fact, many styles of eyewear in the 18th and 19th centuries were appreciated more for their adornment factor than their vision-correction features.

Eyeglasses are considered a fashion statement to this day, and more and more people are embracing eyewear for practical and aesthetic reasons. If you’re seeking a fashion update for your eyeglasses, you should bear three things in mind before you select your frames and lenses.

Your Face Shape

In the past, eyeglasses were made in a handful of one-size-fits-all frame styles. And even though opticians adjusted and tweaked these glasses, there were some people whose facial shapes or lens prescriptions could not accommodate universal eyeglass frames.

Today, however, eyeglass frame designers offer a variety of styles to fit the unique face shapes of various wearers. For example, if you have flatter cheeks and a short nose bridge, your glasses may always slide off your face—to your immense frustration. Know that designers have heard your complaints. There are now glasses with adjustable nose and ear pieces that conform to nearly any head or facial configuration.

Try on glasses in person at a retail eyewear store if you’ve had trouble with ill-fitting glasses in the past. The retail eyewear staff will allow you to experiment with all of the newest styles so you can find out which frames work with your particular prescription.

Take your time choosing the designs that make you look your best. See how you look in round, aviator, and semi-rimless styles to learn how the various frames change and augment your face’s lines and curves.

If you select frames based on how they look on a friend or advertising model, you may be disappointed with how they appear on your face. The only way to see for certain how eyeglasses will enhance or detract from your appearance is to try them on yourself and compare them to other styles.

When you try on various pairs of glasses, you also get the benefit of finding out which materials are comfortable enough to wear during work, school, and other activities. If you have to wear thick lenses, you’ll be happy to learn there are trendy frames that will accommodate your vision while looking great on your face.

Your Work and Play Routines

Before you make your final eyeglass choices, ask yourself how you’ll be using your eyewear. Your answers to this question will help you pick the best frames and lens materials for your lifestyle. You may need several pairs of glasses to meet all of your eyewear needs.

Frames come in upscale designer styles that coordinate with business suits and formal wear. Glasses also come in edgy modern styles suitable for school and hi-tech work environments. If you need frames that stand up to athletic, industrial, or agricultural activity, there are hardcore frames that meet OSHA rules for impact resistance and workplace eyewear safety.

The sheer number of lens and frame combinations you can use to create your new eyeglasses is amazing. Choose progressive, bi-focal, and trifocal lenses to see at various distances without changing your glasses. Choose tinted, coated, and scratch-resistant lenses if you work outside or in harsh environments. When you need maximum eye security, select wraparounds, which are glasses that curve from ear to ear. These safety-style glasses offer protection from the sun and flying debris to the front and sides of your eyes.

Your View on Life

Do you spend a lot of time indoors on a laptop or other digital device? Ease your eyes with special lenses designed for computer work. Computer lenses focus on the middle distance of your work and may offer a variety of features, including HEV light filtering and slight magnification. Various tints and reflective coatings can also make it easier to see in medical and office lighting.

Computer lenses work well for kids who play a lot of video games. However, computer lenses are best used in a digital environment only. Teens may need a second pair of glasses for other activities like driving and sports. Kids and adults who have a habit of breaking glasses should try titanium, Kevlar, and nylon frames that are less destructible than traditional frames.

Do you go from indoors to outdoors repeatedly throughout your day? If your job or hobby requires frequent changes in light conditions, transitional lenses are a great way to keep your glasses on your face and still have adequate vision despite the changes. These special lenses become clear in low-light conditions and turn into UV-protecting sunglasses when out in the daylight glare.

Your local eyewear retailer has a variety of lenses to offer you, including polycarbonate lenses that are great for high-energy kids and adults. Polycarbonate and Trivex lenses are scratch and impact resistant and weigh less than traditional lenses. Photochromic lenses are designed for people with light sensitivity, and they makes great lenses for driving and outdoor sports.

Schedule an appointment with the experienced staff at All About Eyes to see all of the latest styles and materials of eyewear available. We create eyeglasses that suit your face, fit well, and correct your vision properly.